Faq

Below, you'll find answers to the frequently asked questions about eggs, we get.


Question:

Why are some hard cooked eggs difficult to peel?

Answer:
Fresh eggs are more difficult to peel after they are boiled. Eggs kept in the refrigerator for a week to ten days before boiling will peel more easily. Hard-boiled eggs are usually good for up to one week after they have been hard boiled, as long as the shell is not cracked.
Question:

How should eggs be stored?

Answer:

Egg shells contain as many as 17,000 pores, through which the egg can absorb flavors and odors and emit water.  Storing eggs in the original cartons helps to keep them fresh. Eggs should always be refrigerated; an egg will age faster at room temperature than in the refrigerator.

Question:

What are the stringy white pieces in egg whites?

Answer:
The rope-like strands of egg white, called chalazae (kah-lay-za), are a natural, edible part of the egg, not an imperfection or embryo. Chalazae helps to keep the yolk centered in the white and are most noticeable when eggs are very fresh
Question:

Why are some egg yolks paler than others?

Answer:
The color of the yolk is dictated by what the hen eats. Natural carotenoid ingredients such as grass meal, maize, capsicum or marigold products are often used in hens’ feed, which give a deeper colored yolk.
Question:

What is the red spot I can see in the yolk?

Answer:
This is most likely to be what is called a ‘blood spot’, which comes from a ruptured blood vessel. It is relatively common and safe to eat.
Question:

Why are some eggs double yolked?

Answer:
Double yolkers (eggs containing two yolks) tend to come from young hens whose hormone system has not yet fully developed. It is quite rare for an egg to be ‘double yolked’. However, because all the hens in a flock are the same age, it is not unusual to find more than one double yolker in a box
Question:

Why are some eggshells brown and some white?

Answer:
The color of the eggshell depends on the breed of the hen. In general, white hens produce white eggs and brown hens brown eggs, but some crossings exist. There is no nutritional difference between white and brown shelled eggs.
Question:

What is the origin of the SANOVO name?

Answer:

The company name SANOVO was invented in 1961 when Lactosan and Dansk Tøræg Fabrik established the company, SANOVO Levnedsmidler A/S.  


The name SANOVO comes from the three last letters in LactoSAN (our sister company) and the first three letters of the registered company name of Dansk Tøræg Fabrik which was OVOdan. 

OVODAN is today the name of our Chinese egg product factory. See www.ovodan.com

Question:

Does Eggs stored on the benchtop make better cakes?

Answer:
Refrigerating eggs not only keeps them fresh longer but also minimizes the risk of Salmonella growing. If desired, air eggs for several hours immediately prior to making a cake. 
Question:

Should I wash eggs to remove dirt from the shell?

Answer:
The Egg shell becomes more porous when wet, making it easier for bacteria to get inside the egg. You should never wash dirty eggs. To prevent the risk of salmonella you should only use dirty eggs for fully cooked meals, not ice-cream or such.
Question:

Are brown and white shelled eggs are nutritionally different?

Answer:
No, the content of the egg is only determined by the feed of the hens. The color of the eggshell depends on the breed of the hen. In general, white hens produce white eggs and brown hens brown eggs, but some crossings exist.
Question:

What is the risk with raw eggs vs. cooked eggs?

Answer:
Uncooked food that contains raw egg, such as ice-cream, egg mayonnaise, custard and so on, are a higher risk of food poisoning than thoroughly cooked foods. Cooking kills most bacteria like Salmonella. For raw food use pasteurized eggs.
Question:

Does raw eggs have better protein?

Answer:
There is no evidence to suggest that cooking reduces protein content. 
Question:

Are Eggs high in cholesterol so you clog up your arteries?

Answer:
Earlier it was believed that high amounts of cholesterol in your diet led to high cholesterol levels in your bloodstream, contributing to furred arteries and the risk of a heart attack. Recent studies show that dietary cholesterol is not a major cause of high blood cholesterol levels. It is the level of saturated fat in your diet, rather than the cholesterol, that has a greater impact on raising your blood cholesterol levels. Eggs are actually very low in saturated fat.
Question:

Is all the protein found in the egg white.

Answer:
Although the egg white does contain a nice amount of protein, don’t count out the yolk. 60 percent of the protein is in the egg white and 40 percent in the yolk. 
Question:

Is it healthier to toss the egg yolks?

Answer:
No. Besides having a relatively good amount of protein, the yolk also contains heart-healthy unsaturated fat, including omega-3 fats. Egg yolks are also brimming with many good-for-you nutrients, such as riboflavin, vitamin D and vitamin B-12. Plus, the yolk is home to nutrients such as choline, selenium, zeaxanthin and lutein. Choline plays a role in fetal brain development, making choline-rich food (like eggs) a preferable choice for pregnant women. The antioxidant selenium is a trace mineral and is involved in the immune system and hormone balance and may also help protect against certain forms of cancer.  The antioxidants zeaxanthin and lutein have been shown to play a role in eye health and may help reduce the risk of macular degeneration, a leading cause of vision loss that happens as we age. 
Question:

Why are eggs a superfood?

Answer:

UK scientists recommend to eat an egg per day. The egg is valued for its high contenct of vitamins. A hen egg is rich in protein and especially the good combination of aminoacids and the high content of D- and B12 vitamins has advocated the praising words from UK scientists from Manchester Metropolitan University.  Especially children, teenagers and older people can benefit from eating eggs. Carrie Ruxton, the leader doctor of the project sys to the English Telegraph: “The health benefits in eggs are so big that it is not an understatement to call it superfood”.


Source: http://fpn.dk/mad/kostconvenience

close-white

By continuing to browse through this site, you are accepting the use of cookies. Find out more about cookies.